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walt k

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DSCN0980.JPG  DSCN0983.JPG  DSCN0981.JPG  DSCN0985.JPG  DSCN0984.JPG  DSCN0986.JPG 

Well I had to run over to the other side of the county this morning and of course, I can't go over their on the week ends with out stopping by the big flea market. So I came home with two other items. This little miller falls bull nose rabbit plane and this EC Atkins scraper. I couldn't resist because I remember seeing one of these being used as a kid. It didn't have the blade, but I can make one from a card scraper. We use to call them bull horn scrapers because of the shape. I'm sure you guys know the right name for them, but I don't. The blade is wider then the Stanley #80, which I like. You can cover a larger area with little effort. I also like the curved piece of metal inlay ed into the wood. So as you tighten down on the wing nuts you add a curve to the iron. Here it is for comparison in size with a Stanley #80 and the other wood scraper from my other post.



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timetestedtools

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Reply with quote  #2 
Nice finds
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Glen

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Reply with quote  #3 
The MF is a type 1. The logo should have the triangle separate from the trapezoid shape. The red screw cap is uncommon. I have one like it and actually use it on occasion!
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walt k

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Hey guys , sorry for taking a white to get back. This week Sunday was time for me to reflect and remember friends I served with that didn't make it back. Visited a few memorials and graves. Glen I did take it apart and saw the logo on the underside of the iron. Not sure if the iron should be bevel up or down on these, but the iron was put in with the logo down. As for the scraper I did take a few mins. to do some looking on EC Atkins co. They call this a rams horn scraper. So we were close calling it a bulls horn. I still think it looks more like that then a rams horn. Had some time to look at bull horns as I was running from them as a kid. In my teen years spent a few summers working on my uncle's dariy farm. Being a city kid an being more interested in boats, my parents thought it would do me some good to find out how hard farm work was.I gained a lot of respect for farmers.
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comboprof

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Reply with quote  #5 
The logo should go up and the bevel down. In general I think the manufacture wants his logo to be seen so I always assume the logo goes up. Regardless the bevel goes down for MF No. 4.

Is there a vintage plane where the bevel goes up? 
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timetestedtools

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Quote:
Originally Posted by comboprof
Is there a vintage plane where the bevel goes up? 


Lots of them. Stanley 62 and 164. Sargent 514 and to many block planes to count.

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walt k

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Reply with quote  #7 
That what I Would think, logo up. This one had it down. As for planes, bevel up or down has always been a talked about topic. I was taught that on block planes, put the bevel up. On all other bench planes bevel down. I'm sure their are some that will feel differently.
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Glen

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Reply with quote  #8 
It's more than that really. A 30 degree grind plus a 45 degree bedding angle makes a 75 degree angle into the wood!

Anything more than 30 degrees on the bed will be bevel down because that is the normal angle on the grind and ya gotta have some clearance. If the bed is less than 30, then it'll be bevel up. That part's pretty much physics talking.

The real call for preference is whether some prefer the low angle vs higher angle bed, which dictates a BU or BD approach. That gets into religion territory!
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walt k

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Reply with quote  #9 
Yea Glen that is Perty much what I was taught. What is interesting though is what different wood working craftsmen have learned to do in their craft. I learned most of what I do from old wood boat builders. As a kid I hung around the boat shades. Kind of became a go for for those wood workers. like carpenters and cabinet makers and all the others. They learn how to use their tools in ways to make their tools work effectively for them. That's why I like this hobby. Theirs just so much to learn from so many different craftsmen. Also I'm going to take some pictures of it a part. I was surprised when I took it a part to see how bed it need restoring. Inside this thing looked as if it had only been used a few time. So who ever owned it, took very good care of it.
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Glen

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Reply with quote  #10 
Mine looks like that as well. I really like it. Not too many people actually use them, and a lot of people have bad things to say about the Stanley version..and this is a spitting image of the Stanley.

But then, a lot of people like the skew rabbet blocks and I found that I really don't, so when it comes to my opinion at least, take it with a pound and a half of salt!

Just don't repaint that screw cap. That red pops like nothin' in a toolbox and it's in great shape [smile]
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comboprof

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by timetestedtools
Lots of them. Stanley 62 and 164. Sargent 514 and to many no CK planes to count.


Yes of course. Still I belive I am correct that the MF 4 (and Stanley 75, etc) are bevel down.
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comboprof

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Reply with quote  #12 
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Originally Posted by Glen
Mine looks like that as well. I really like it.


So ... you really like it. Can you tell us how to use it and what to use it for. (I have a Stanley 75, never used and still in the box.) Even Patrick Leach likes it. However Derek hates it. I tried searching and I see a lot of idiots filling down the front sole so that it is coplanar with the rear, but I have yet to find someone using it correctly. I did see some discussion on adding a handle which seems like a good idea id you were to use it a lot.
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Glen

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Reply with quote  #13 
It's good for trimming in tight rabbets where a longer plane can't get. Less chisel work. I've also used it for the obligatory chamfers (that I do horribly but love to watch the pointy-headed shaving fly out for anyway). I have yet to clean up anything long with it. Probably never will.

I also have no clue why people mess with them as the slightly higher sole in front never bothered me. I just set it for tiny shavings. Perhaps people are expecting low angle shoulder plane or smoother performance out of them? It really is just a utility rabbet trimmer, to me...
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Splinter

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Reply with quote  #14 
Hi Walt, Did you ever find out anymore information on you Rams Horn Cabinet Scraper?  I have one just like yours and I have been trying to find out the year it was made.  BTW, mine came with the card scraper installed.  I think it's gonna be a user.


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walt k

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Reply with quote  #15 

Hey splinter Their made by E.C. Atkins which was started in 1855 in Cleveland Ohio. They later moved to Indianapolis Id. Their more know for their saws. Blades for them show up on eBay every once in a while so they must have made a number of them and they must have been liked by users, to have so many blade floating around. I made a blade for mind out of an old saw blade and it works well. I like it because its so large it doesn't cramp your hands using it. Here is a web site where you can get a little more history. As for the years they were made, I haven't been able to find out. They really never changed from when they first started making them. I hope this helps.

 

Vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=1647


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