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dyoungmoses
I recently picked this rusty plane out of a bucket of junk. Despite its poor condition I had never seen anything like it and it had a Sandusky TC iron in it so it was not likely modern junk. After an hour combing through datamp patents I found it was patent #145,106 granted Dec 3, 1873 to George Huber & Aaron Flickinger of Norwalk, Ohio. This one did not get far from home.  612F059B-D59B-4035-AD52-FCD3FB0C251A.jpeg  E74D68F6-E404-4B12-A5D6-986E2F36365E.jpeg  FBFB9E74-00B1-4118-85DF-354CC6613347.jpeg
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woodbutcher
Great find, I'm jealous. This one of those makers at the top of my wish list.
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timetestedtools
That is definitely a cool find. If you can post a few more pictures I'd like to post that on the website 
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dyoungmoses
0E06A5EE-60F9-4820-BCC2-ED9E3521D972.jpeg  9C830151-6F88-46BC-A2D0-54845691535E.jpeg  D5BA5721-CFD4-4BFD-995B-B4C442CE369B.jpeg  FFDB4085-9C84-4D43-BFCD-B82AC9D267D7.jpeg  29134766-6661-4AEE-ACAA-FCCBBA7A81AF.jpeg  266A273C-C500-4FF3-A696-62BBE448DABA.jpeg  Here are a few more pics. Looks like the original T post pulled out of the lever cap and a carriage bolt was substituted to keep the plane working. The shape of the top of the tote is identical to the handle of a Sandusky Tool Co. panel/slitting gauge. I bet the tote was either factored from STC or is a replacement tote for a wood bench plane that was drilled for the bolt. This plane was patented in 1873 and obviously influenced by Bailey’s work. I wonder if this plane was pitched to the Sandusky Tool Co (only recently founded in 1869) and its “new” technology rejected. While the STC patented machines to produce wood planes faster and cheaper and went on to become a market gorilla they also soon offered Morris Patent Planes. Those fancy cast iron planes with traditional design drove the first nail in the STC coffin almost the year they were founded. This planes design is one of the most innovative concepts of its day yet it likely failed because it was prone to chatter. This shortcoming was used as a basis to suspect and reject it as a whole rather than improve its virtues and limit its flaws.
In 1873-4 Norwalk, Ohio had 3 foundries and even more machine shops, railroad access, short access to  Great lakes and Erie Canal distribution. Perfect 19th century incubator yet this innovative patent failed. Why?
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johnf
That really is quite a find. Quite a hefty construction and a very unique way that frog is put in there, I have never seen any quite like that. I also like that tote styling. Like a shaker or minimalist style.
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timetestedtools
Did you see this one  https://www.timetestedtools.net/2018/06/15/huber-and-flickinger-patent-plane/ 
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johnf
Not known to have been manufactured.... Now those really are as rare as hen's teeth.
Thanks for pointing out the previous post, Don
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dyoungmoses
Don, thank you for the link i did come across it when researching the plane.  I have been to your site in the past but only now discovered the forum.  Well done it is right up my alley.
David
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