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jcalabough
I recently acquired a Keen Kutter 120 that doesn't match any of the current typing information. I believe it is a copy of thee 1900-1905 Ohio 120 and made for Keen Kutter. The sole is 7 1/16 by 1 7/8 with a 1 1/2 in iron. The numbering style and location doesn't match any other KK 120 I have seen and the iron is stamped with the cresent logo reported to be used on transitionals.  My questions are what was the actual year of manufacturing, and should I restore it or leave it as is, cleaned, waxed and sharpened.  Does anyone else have one like this?  

Thanks for your help  Jerry  

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BRock
Hey Jerry, I think you are spot on. The Semi-circular Saw Tooth mark was used from 1899 - 1905 primarily on wooden and transitionals but it has also been noted on early block planes. The early production KK block planes were marked with the   KK at the toe and the number at the heel. It is assumed that these examples are the earliest production of the KK series of planes that started fully in 1906. The use of the saw tooth mark seems to indicate that these were manufactured or at least contract specified prior to the adoption of the wedge and bar logo in 1905. In my opinion you have a late 1904 manufactured plane that was released by Simmons in 1905. Consensus is that they were manufactured by the Ohio Tool Co. According to Alvin Sellens book these types are relatively rare and command a premium price over later types.
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Glen
Looks like brock's got the skinny on it. I'll just add that it's a really cool block plane :)

I like the way they did the iron..the piened-in adjuster rack is something I have never seen before!
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jcalabough
Thanks for your quick responses. Given the very early typing, how many more do you think still exist? It has been well used, the Japaning is almost gone, but it was not  abused. Should I keep it "as found" or do a restoration? I have no idea what it is worth, does anyone have a ball park figure they will share?
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BRock
Value is tough, average KK120 planes run $35 to $60. Given the early type I would think closer to the $60  maybe more given the rarity even considering the condition but you still have to find a KK collector that needs or wants one. If it was mine I would sharpen the blade do a lite cleaning and put it to use. IMO a full restro would only reduce any future collector value and would not improve the performance of a keeper. Luckily that decision is yours not mine. Enjoy.
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jcalabough
Thanks for the help. I will for now put it in my user collection and keep it original.  Take Care,  Jerry
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