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ajg681

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Posts: 63
Reply with quote  #1 
Hello All, 
I have run into a new one for me, and would appreciate any wisdom anyone is willing to share. I have a Type 10 Stanley No 4 that I picked up for $2.50. Everything was rusted and siezed, and it was missing parts that I happened to have, and its not cracked. So, I went ahead and took it as a challenge. After electrolysis, the only major issue remaining is the thread post that the depth adjustment knob rides on is rusted and the knob won't come free. The knob is adjusted all of the way in (closest to the frog). So, it needs to be turned to the right for the knob to move, since it can't go to the left any further. After soaking in Kroil, I was able to carefully remove the entire screw from the frog on accident. When turning the knob to the right to back it off, the first thing to give was the threaded post instead. Now I have the threaded post and knob stuck together and separated from the frog. I don't want to monkey up the threads by gripping it in a vise, and there isn't much there to grab. 

I soaked the knob in Kroil again this morning. My only thought is to clean off the oil, and threadlock the post back into the frog, and then try it again. If it is still as seized as I think, I don't think blue thread lock is going to help much, but I haven't seen a rusted screw that couldn't be loosened with Kroil before. 

My only other idea that just popped into my head is to try and screw the post to an older frog with a right hand thread, then maybe it would be getting tighter into the frog in the direction I need to turn the knob? I have no idea if that would work or if the only difference between the older RH thread and LH is thread direction or not. Last thing I want to do is screw up a good frog on an old plane just to save this thing- which by most accounts should have stayed in whatever fence row it was found in. 

Maybe a new post and knob is the only solution. Anyone ever have this problem? 
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TheOldFart

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Reply with quote  #2 
The secret sauce for stubborn threads is 50% ATF and 50% acetone. Shake well. It will move!
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I have a lot of mitre boxes but I'm not a collector [rolleyes]
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ajg681

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Reply with quote  #3 
Okay, great. I will try that. Thanks for the quick reply! I appreciate you sharing and for everyone's participation on these boards. I have a lot more confidence with what this group comes up with over some of what I see on the Facebook groups- feels a little like the blind leading the blind over there to me....

I will let you know if it worked!
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Glen

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ol' rusty hands
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Reply with quote  #4 
Propane torch on the thread. Try to avoid the knob.

Grab the thread TIGHT between a pair of woody things and then turn the knob.

Get a new one.

Aside from Kevin's advice, this is all I've got...
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corelz125

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Reply with quote  #5 
evaporust has worked for me with some frozen parts
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timetestedtools

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Reply with quote  #6 
saok in 50% ATF and 50% acetone. A couple days won't hurt. Then get a piece of aluminum flashing and line your vise. Clap the threads in the aluminum. The trick is to clamp it as tight as you can. Then wrap some vise grips in the same aluminum and lightly clamp the knob. Heat it as you wiggle the vise grips. You wonder what was holding it in the first place.
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