Time Tested Tools and Forge Forum.

For discussions on Collecting & Restoring Vintage hand tools.

Back to The TimeTestedTools Website

timetestedtools
http://www.timetestedtools.net/2017/01/04/who-made-the-pressed-steel-frog-bench-planes/


Vintage-Franklin-hand-plane-10.jpg    



Don
http://www.timetestedtools.net
Quote 0 0
mknickel
Sure looks like PEXTO had a corner on the "five and dime" planes you got at Woolworths and J.C. Penny.  Mass marketing to the uninformed.  Make it cheap and inexpensive, slap a brand name on it and sell it by an old perception of high quality and craftsmanship. (Survival by reputation) Kind of like today with a lot of Stanley-Black and Decker, Skill, Kenmore/Craftsman products (and a bunch more I can't recall).  At least Sargent had the good sense to get out of the tool business. 

That's my homily for the day.
Quote 0 0
timetestedtools
the amazing part is the shear volume of these basically worthless specimens that people bought without any understanding that they were never going to work as planned.
Quote 0 0
PaulM
Thanks Don, interesting.  The assumption here is that the pressed steel was cheaper to manufacture, but was it really?  The body had to be cast, so that equipment was already necessary.  I wonder if someone actually thought the the steel was as good as cast?  Or it was done to avoid some patent infringement.  Is there any info about this? 
Quote 0 0
poa
Most of the tuna can planes I run across are Fultons. I have a Worth I bought years ago, at a garage sale, not knowing any better. One of these days I'll remember to haul it down to the yawl and bury it at sea. If ya'll read, someday, that a Great White has been captured with a handplane in its gut, it'll be a fitting obit.
Quote 0 0
timetestedtools
PaulM wrote:
Thanks Don, interesting.  The assumption here is that the pressed steel was cheaper to manufacture, but was it really?  The body had to be cast, so that equipment was already necessary.  I wonder if someone actually thought the the steel was as good as cast?  Or it was done to avoid some patent infringement.  Is there any info about this? 


It's not just the pressed steel frog, its everything about these planes that makes them of less value. They never have decent wood, the adjusters are crap, and they have no finish. Most didn't even have a name other than a paper sticker.

They sold cheap, so the assumption is they are cheaper to manufacture.

I don't believe any of them have any kind of Patent, so I don't think there is a patent to aviod, but I could be proven wrong.
Quote 0 0
PaulM
good points Don. I was wondering if any of the experts here had seen a well made plane with a stamped frog. Conventional wisdom is usually correct, but it never hurts to investigate. 




Quote 0 0
timetestedtools
PaulM wrote:
good points Don. I was wondering if any of the experts here had seen a well made plane with a stamped frog. Conventional wisdom is usually correct, but it never hurts to investigate. 



You are absolutely correct. To add an interesting note, there are some good pressed steel planes. But even most of those have a cast frog. Like the "S" series of Stanley. (S4, S5 etc)

I can't think of a plane with a pressed steel frog that was made with quality, but it may be. I can't see why it wouldn't work.

Quote 0 0
Glen
It would have to be a pretty manly gauge of steel...
Quote 0 0
Paul E.
Here is my sole connection to this topic. My friend Bill Thomas gave me this plane as a complete rust ball one day when we were down at his barn.

L 13 1/2"
W 2 7/16"
W of iron 1 15/16"

There is a U in a circle just aft of the frog seat.

The iron is stamped CRUSADER.

I did my best.
Cleaned, set the frog, sharpened...
It chattered.

I hope nobody is froze up too bad.
Mighty quiet here abouts. Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0075.JPG, Views: 104, Size: 532.35 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0076.JPG, Views: 98, Size: 285.36 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0077.JPG, Views: 88, Size: 528.84 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0078.JPG, Views: 90, Size: 244.94 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0079.JPG, Views: 90, Size: 319.42 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0080.JPG, Views: 87, Size: 266.34 KB Click image for larger version - Name: IMG_0081.JPG, Views: 77, Size: 264.60 KB
Quote 0 0
timetestedtools
I almost bought this today, but here is a steel frog that's not pressed (or doesn't look it anyway) Whatcha think Glen?


rps20170107_164100_417.jpg rps20170107_164119_308.jpg IMG_20170107_122546378.jpg rps20170107_164155_480.jpg 
Quote 0 0
Glen
I think the frog design looks pretty cool and might actually work.

The depth adjuster is ugly as sin though.



And I am frozen. But I am awake here at 2am because I'll be boarding a plane for Florida in about 3.5 hours.
Quote 0 0
old dog
I was given this Ben-Hur branded plane by a family member.  It was very rusty and had a bent frog and adjuster lever, but I did enjoy restoring it.  As mentioned previously, it does not smooth wood all that well, so my plan is to try and convert it to a scrub plane. ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XN5QSTaVzRQ ) I hope it makes a decent scrub plane since it is lighter and more compact than better quality planes.  I also have a stamped steel Stanley Handyman H102 that was my fathers.  This light weight and compact block plane is nice to have on hand for rough trimming and fitting jobs.
ben hur.JPG  top cmp.JPG  20161109_141555.jpg
Quote 0 0
timetestedtools
According to PTAMPIA Ben Hur was sold by Van Camp and made by A.B.Caldwell Mfg Co in Indianapolis, IN. 
Quote 1 0
old dog
Thanks for the reply Don.  I live in Indiana, so this is nice to know.  The names you provided helped me find this: http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/ben-hur-plane-1925-1940-nearly-unused-1821676850 The seller in this link seems to think his plane was made by Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co. of Southington, CT.  My adjusting know is smaller that the one in the link.  Thanks again for the info.
Quote 0 0

Back to the Top